Allergan PLC (AGN)

AGN (NYSE:Drugs) EQUITY
$273.80
pos +0.00
+0.00%
Today's Range: 270.52 - 277.68 | AGN Avg Daily Volume: 3,572,200
Last Update: 02/05/16 - 4:02 PM EST
Volume: 0
YTD Performance: -12.38%
Open: $0.00
Previous Close: $272.45
52 Week Range: $237.50 - $340.34
Oustanding Shares: 394,124,530
Market Cap: 107,379,228,198
6-Month Chart
TheStreet Ratings Grade for AGN
Buy Hold Sell
A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- E+ E E- F
TheStreet Ratings is the source for accurate ratings that you can rely upon to make sound, informed financial decisions. Click here to find out about our methodology.
Analysts Ratings
Historical Rec Current 1 Mo. Ago 2 Mo. Ago 3 Mo. Ago
Strong Buy 10 11 11 11
Moderate Buy 2 2 2 2
Hold 0 0 0 0
Moderate Sell 1 1 1 1
Strong Sell 0 0 0 0
Mean Rec. 1.38 1.36 1.36 1.36
Latest Dividend: 0.05
Latest Dividend Yield: 0.08%
Dividend Ex-Date: 02/25/15
Price Earnings Ratio: -40.24
Price Earnings Comparisons:
AGN Sector Avg. S&P 500
-40.24 35.80 30.32
Price Performance History (%Change):
3 Mo 1 Yr 3 Y
0.00% 0.00% 216.39%
GROWTH 12 Mo 3 Yr CAGR
Revenue 50.50 1.85 0.41
Net Income 0.00 -7.29 0.00
EPS 0.00 -4.53 0.00
Earnings for AGN:
EBITDA 3.40B
Revenue 13.06B
Average Earnings Estimates
Qtr (12/15) Qtr (03/16) FY (12/15) FY (12/16)
Average Estimate $3.35 $4.10 $15.35 $16.07
Number of Analysts 7 2 7 10
High Estimate $3.83 $4.21 $15.92 $17.70
Low Estimate $3.16 $3.99 $15.06 $14.35
Prior Year $3.91 $4.30 $13.98 $15.35
Growth Rate (Year over Year) -14.29% -4.65% 9.80% 4.72%
Chart Benchmark Timeframe
Average Frequency Indicator Chart
Scale Symbol Comparison Bollinger Bands
By

Doug Kass

 | Feb 3, 2016 | 4:35 PM EST
The market is almost unplayable for most. A crude reversal likely was the catalyst for the turnaround, as quants ran on board the train from the morning lows. As I mentioned this morning, there is little edge or trend right now. If you trade, keep your value at risk (VAR) low because the large swings can produce big profit/loss changes on relatively small positions. Volatility "cubed" in a market dominated by machines and algos that don't look at income statements or balance sheets and have no concept of intrinsic value. It's in Nowhere Land, at least on a short term basis.  But I am of the view that the primary/intermediate trend is lower -- time to trade and be careful with investments. I still look for a low double-digit decline in the S&P 500 in 2016. Ss (S&P) over Ns (Nasdaq) and Rs flat (Russell). I traded actively today with some success, trying to be opportunistic and trying to embrace panic and euphoria. In other words, "Get It While You Can" is my mantra.  I ended the day market-neutral, shorting SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) on a 40-handle move off the lows ($191.35).  My five largest longs and shorts.  The decline in the value of the U.S. dollar was a key feature of the trading day, though I heard little discussion in the business media. Crude oil reversed dramatically, closing up $2.52 a barrel. Nat gas was unchanged. Gold was up another $13.40 per ouce. Still working on a memo on precious metals. Agricultural commodities: wheat up three cents, corn down two cents, soybean nine cents lower  and oats four cents lower. After a lot of intraday movement, bonds were essentially unchanged, with the 10-year and 30-year up by one to three basis points in yield. iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT) was down more than a beaner. Municipals were well-bid and closed-end municipal bond funds were up by a few cents apiece. High yield was bid. iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) was up 38 cents and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) was up 12 cents. Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) was seven cents to the good. Bank-selling got panicky early in the day, I added across the board. Comerica (CMA), JPMorgan Chase (JPM), Blackstone Group (BX) and Goldman Sachs (GS) ended the day higher after a pressured morning session. I observed that bank-centric sovereign debt funds might be responsible for the almost irrational selling of late. Here's my Chart of the Day on the aforementioned selling by sovereign wealth funds.  Staples responded well to a lower dollar Energy stocks were flat despite the ride in the resource. Biotech looks awful; they were flat on the day with Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) rallying but Allergan (AGN) declining. Old tech didn't participate in the afternoon rally, but IBM (IBM) rose by $1.50. Alibaba (BABA) and Yahoo! (YHOO) were bad. Retail was mixed, with Macy's (M) a leader to the upside and Home Depot (HD) and Lowe's (LOW) downside leaders with large dollar drops today. I bought more GS (it rallied by $4 from today's purchase), Morgan Stanley (MS) (big recovery) and BX (nice reversal). (T)FANG is breaking down and rolling over -- a constant refrain of mine over the last four months. Tesla (TSLA) was down $10, Netflix (NFLX) down $1 and Alphabet (GOOGL) reversed most of its previous-day gain. Amazon (AMZN), which I featured today, continues to get schmeissed -- down $21. It is Bill Miller's largest holding (about 10% weighting). but I disagree, respectfully, with Bill. NOSH was broadly lower, led by Starbucks (SBUX) and O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY). CRABBY looked better, with only Allstate (ALL) and BAC lower. In individual stocks: Procter & Gamble (PG) and DuPont (DD) -- two new Best Ideas List entrants as longs -- were standouts to the upside. Potash (POT) reversed yesterday's loss. Life insurance stocks, including my shorts Lincoln National (LNC) and MetLife (MET0, were standouts to the downside (again). I hope you enjoyed
By

Jim Cramer

 | Jan 21, 2016 | 12:39 PM EST

TheStreet's Jim Cramer says Palo Alto Networks is the best way to play the security market.

By

Doug Kass

 | Jan 11, 2016 | 3:32 PM EST
Very whippy market with a negative bias thus far. I have been quite bearish for some time, but I believe we are close to a tradeable bounce. On a near-term basis we are oversold; indeed, S&P futures were nearly 40 handles below the 3 p.m. ET Friday levels around 2:30 ET today. I feel lonely buying; I've moved from market neutral all the way to medium-size long in the last day of trading. I look at reward versus risk in all my buys, and that is why I am more upbeat (no different than late August). Am I still negative over the intermediate term? You're damn right I am! But it is my view that a bounce would be a contrary move (Rev Shark disagrees and sees dip buyers -- I don't). But that is what makes the race! He is right more often than not. The U.S. dollar was stronger today. The continued fall in crude oil -- down $2 a barrel -- is the proximate cause of weakness in the indices. Gold is down two beaners and silver down by nine cents. Agricultural commodities got hit, led by wheat (down 11 cents), corn (down a nickel) and soybean (four cents lower). Bonds were mixed by maturities; the yield on the two-year down by two basis points  and the 30-year up by a relatively large four basis points to 2.96%. Ergo, the yield curve became steeper -- good for banks. Municipals are down small. I would be paring back muni closed-end  bond funds after the recent rise, if still long. High yield has a bid today, despite the drop in long bond prices and meaningfully lower energy prices. However, Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) is getting hit. Banks were mixed, with Citigroup (C) the standout to the upside (now near day's high). I am intrigued!   I continue to add to the bank space (three money centers), not necessarily for the near term but for a multiyear play. I have large positions in C and Bank of America (BAC). I added to alternative investment manager Oaktree Capital Group (OAK), which is down $2 late today (it has halved its daily loss). The object of my disaffection, life insurers -- including Lincoln National (LNC) and MetLife (MET) -- are getting destroyed today and have become important profit-and-loss contributors from the highs for my portfolio. Retail was stronger; Macy's (M) is up $2 based on activist movement. Kohl's (KSS) is also a winner on talk of an leveraged buyout. ( I consistently have been a buyer of the group on weakness over the last two weeks). New low in iShares China Large-Cap (FXI); it remains on my Best Ideas List as a short.  My energy shorts, Exxon Mobil (XOM) and Schlumberger (SLB), are the world's fair and have become important winners in my portfolio. Arch Coal (ACI), a favorite of yesteryear to many, filed bankruptcy. Peak Icahn! Icahn's Freeport-McMoran (FCX) is getting schmeissed again -- down by 25%. His oil holdings are nearly as bad. And then there is Apple (AAPL). New low in Caterpillar (CAT). Remember my surprise that the CEO will be replaced!)  Fertilizers -- for example, Potash (POT) -- are acting like dung. Old tech acts better, led by Cisco (CSCO), Intel (INTC) and IBM (IBM). Autos are good on a relative and absolute basis, but considering the magnitude of their recent weakness, I am not surprised. Staying short. A "Biowreck" today -- down by 4% to 5%. Led by Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX), Allergan (AGN) and Mallinckrodt (MNK). Secondary biotech even worse.  I dissed Apple's decision on the headphone jack (in three installments ): "Are You Serious, Apple?"  (T)FANG is mixed. Tesla (TSLA) is leading on the downside and Netflix (NFLX) on the upside even though the latter's Golden Globes acceptance was disappointing NOSH was tasty, with all four components higher. CRABBY was strong on a relative basis, led by Alleghany (Y) and the aforementioned C. I revised  my "Fair Market Value " for the S&P Index to 1860 this morning.
By

Jim Cramer and Jack Mohr

 | Jan 8, 2016 | 12:30 PM EST

We're looking for positives among the negatives.

By

Jim Cramer

 | Jan 7, 2016 | 12:35 PM EST

TheStreet's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio Manager Jim Cramer isn't a fan of the volatility index, or VIX, amid the global markets sell off.

By

Doug Kass

 | Dec 30, 2015 | 3:55 PM EST
After the opening dip, the market flatlined most of the day. The U.S. dollar was flat on the day. Bonds, after getting whacked hard yesterday, are essentially unchanged. Non-taxables were better bid and municipals are not displaying the sort of volatility that governments are. High yield is slightly to the good and Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) is up a few pennies. Crude oil closed down $1.15 and natural gas lost 15 cents-- it has become a volatile commodity. Energy stocks got hit. Gold, the orphan commodity, fell another $8. Wheat and corn were much lower, but soybeans advanced. Financials were victims of profit-taking; I wouldn't chase the recent strength, though I love the group on an intermediate-term basis.   (T) FANG reversed yesterday's wild up, but not meaningfully so. NOSH was mixed. CRABBY was also mixed. Retail stocks experienced little change. Biotechs also were flat, but Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) and Allergan (AGN) advanced. Old tech had some profit-taking. As expressed throughout the week, I don't like the setup into the new year.
By

Doug Kass

 | Dec 29, 2015 | 4:16 PM EST
It is typically a hard chore to explain the daily moves in a market without memory from day to day. Whether this is a cessation of tax-loss selling -- as suggested by Stephen Weiss on "Fast Money" today -- a Santa Claus rally or simply a year-end markup, no one can know for sure. I am inclined to believe in the markup thesis -- just look at the league-leading (T)FANG performance today (buying the winners for portfolio inclusion at year-end). Another signal is that the trashy and underperforming sectors failed to rally with the markets. Furthermore, volume was ridiculously light. I plan to aggressively short any further move to the upside. I just put out more SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) short at $207.60 and added to my PowerShares UltraShort S&P 500 (SDS) long at $19.26. There was no apparent catalyst for the ramp in the trading session. Ns (Nasdaq) over Ss (S&P) and Rs (Russell).  Oil was stronger (up a beaner) and U.S. Oil Fund (USO) gained 34 cents. (I have been a buyer). Gold, the orphan commodity, was flat. Agricultural commodities were very strong, led by wheat, up 2%, and coffee, up a similar amount percentagewise. Interest rates spiked higher. iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT) lost more than $2 and the five-year U.S. note is back near the June 2015 highs. The two-year U.S. note's yield is up to 1.10% (up five basis points), the 10-year  at 2.31% (up eight bps) and the 30-year yield is up 10 bps to 3.04%. Municipals did not move, however. Nor did the closed-end municipal bond funds. High yield was better bid, with iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond Fund (HYG) up 49 cents, but Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) didn't budge. The U.S. dollar was stronger, but consumer staples rallied nonetheless. Retail was only slightly higher. Banks were the world's fair. The sector remains my favorite. Money centers trumped regionals. Biotech was up but by less than 2%, with Allergan (AGN) leading the pack after some recent underperformance. (T)FANG was terrific, led by Tesla (TSLA) up 3%, Amazon (AMZN) up 3% and Google, now Alphabet (GOOG), up 2%. NOSH was tasty, with all components up on the day. My new acronym, CRABBY, was mixed today.  Thanks for the nice input o
By

Doug Kass

 | Dec 28, 2015 | 2:48 PM EST
Mr. Market flatlined from the lower opening and at around 130 p.m. embarked upon a 10-handle rally in the S&P Index, where I shorted more SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) at $205.05 and added to PowerShares UltraShort S&P 500 (SDS) long at $19.75. Interest rates were mixed , with only slight movement among the maturities. Municipals were flat, though some of my old favorites (closed-end municipal funds) rallied, again. High yield was junky -- iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) was down by 0.5% and so was SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK). Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB), strong recently, got hit by 22 cents. I am back as a buyer at $13.40.  The U.S. dollar was unchanged, as were consumer staples that correlate with our currency. The price of crude declined $1.28, taking along energy equities. But natural gas was up 19 cents. Copper continued weak, down by four to five cents. Agricultural commodities (wheat, corn and soybean) were hit by profit-taking after some recent strength. Lumber got schmeissed -- down by nearly 3%. Gold fell by ten beaners. (T)FANG performed well, led by what appear to be markups in Amazon (AMZN) and Google, now Alphabet (GOOGL). NOSH was mixed , though O'Reilly (ORLY) was up more than a dollar. Banks rallied off the lows but were down on the day. Brokerages -- including Goldman Sachs (GS) and Morgan Stanley (MS) -- lagged. Autos were sold. Retail was slightly lower; Target (TGT) was a downside leader. Best Buy (BBY), last week's entry onto my Best Ideas List, was marginally higher.  Old tech was weak, led by IBM (IBM). Fertilizers weaker across the board, perhaps in response to lower ag commodities prices. Potash (POT) off a large fraction of a dollar. Biotech is lower by 1% or so on a bunch of specific company news items. Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) was a standout to the downside on the CEO's pneumonia. Allergan (AGN) also rolling over. Disney (DIS) bounces after good box office receipts and a week-long stock swoon. Apple (AAPL) is conspicuously weak, again; it looks to be rolling over at year end. Not the best of signposts for January 2016.
By

Doug Kass

 | Dec 14, 2015 | 4:11 PM EST
From my perch, we may be in a classic year-end selling climax in high-yield bond funds (more on this tomorrow morning), similar to the mid-December 2013 tax-related selling in closed-end municipal bond funds that provided many of us with great entry points. Sellers, from my perch, are late to a one-and-a-half-year bear market in junk bonds. (Again, more tomorrow.) I have highlighted widening spreads all year as a possible precursor to weakening equities. Remember the junk bond chart overlaid against SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) from early in 2015? Third Avenue's Focus Credit Fund was such a mess because the fund, now under $1 billion in assets, used to be near $5 billion. The redemption process over last two years resulted in the manager selling what he could, and the fund is now left with the "off the rack" and illiquid garbage. As I observed in my piece critical of Carl Icahn, high-yield bond funds have weathered the higher volume and price carnage in the underlying securities. But the end of the Bubble Era of Debt is probably here or near.  I continue to expect the markets to continue to stabilize and respond positively to "One and Slow" on Wednesday. Taxable bonds sold off sizably and municipals were offered. Closed-end muni bond funds (I am out of these names) were hit badly on 1.) a sizable decline in taxable and nontaxable bonds, and (2) collateral damage presented by the high-yield bond fund drop. High yield continues to be junky (see my first bullet point). Up Down Up Down Up today, in a market governed by emotions and machines. Jim calls the market "Crazytown" and I agree.  Crude rallied 78 cents;  I paid $11 for U.S. Oil Fund (USO). But natural gas was down another 10 cents, or 5%. Other commodities: Gold down $11, wheat up $1.50, corn up 1%, and lumber down by 1.8%. Retail was mixed to higher. Among my holdings, Macy's (M) was down, Best Buy (BBY) was up, Bed, Bath & Beyond (BBBY) was down and Wal-Mart (WMT) was up. I have been adding. Banks were mixed and trafficked well despite credit concerns. On the other hand, higher yields should be a plus. I have been adding over the last three days. LIfe insurance stocks were surprisingly lower, considering the breakdown in iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT); usually the opposite causation occurs. Biotech was flat to slightly lower. Allergan (AGN) seems to be breaking down and Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) is holding in the low nineties. Consumer staples were well-bid as the U.S. dollar weakened and is approaching 1.10 again against the euro. (T)FANG was mixed, with Amazon (AMZN) a standout on the plus side. Google, now Alphabet (GOOGL), was up 1%. I am short the others in TFANG! NOSH was higher, save Starbucks (SBUX). Comparing mortgage-backed securities and other derivatives that brought the world's financial system to its knees and closed-end high-yield debt funds (as Carl Icahn has done) is nonsensical, at least to me.  I expanded my long exposure today, covering (and trading around) portions of several core short positions. I
By

Jim Cramer

 | Dec 14, 2015 | 3:56 PM EST

Anyone who isn't at least a tad cautious is either arrogant, clueless or both.

On a fun note these are my two choices for the best Super Bowl Ads on Sunday: 1. I am bias...
The sharp decline in the index in the first half of January and then the reflexive bounce ...

Nice work on the diary today, Bret. Tough day but you killed it.

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