Nike Inc (NKE)

NKE (NYSE:Consumer Non-Durables) EQUITY
$56.42
pos +0.00
+0.00%
Today's Range: 55.50 - 57.45 | NKE Avg Daily Volume: 10,578,900
Last Update: 02/12/16 - 4:00 PM EST
Volume: 0
YTD Performance: -9.73%
Open: $0.00
Previous Close: $56.00
52 Week Range: $45.72 - $68.20
Oustanding Shares: 1,703,148,430
Market Cap: 95,376,312,080
6-Month Chart
TheStreet Ratings Grade for NKE
Buy Hold Sell
A+ A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- E+ E E- F
TheStreet Ratings is the source for accurate ratings that you can rely upon to make sound, informed financial decisions. Click here to find out about our methodology.
Analysts Ratings
Historical Rec Current 1 Mo. Ago 2 Mo. Ago 3 Mo. Ago
Strong Buy 19 19 19 19
Moderate Buy 1 1 1 1
Hold 4 4 4 4
Moderate Sell 0 0 0 0
Strong Sell 0 0 0 0
Mean Rec. 1.35 1.35 1.35 1.35
Latest Dividend: 0.16
Latest Dividend Yield: 1.14%
Dividend Ex-Date: 12/07/15
Price Earnings Ratio: 27.18
Price Earnings Comparisons:
NKE Sector Avg. S&P 500
27.18 27.20 26.86
Price Performance History (%Change):
3 Mo 1 Yr 3 Y
-10.43% 22.65% 104.83%
GROWTH 12 Mo 3 Yr CAGR
Revenue 10.10 0.27 0.08
Net Income 21.50 0.47 0.14
EPS 24.60 0.57 0.16
Earnings for NKE:
EBITDA 4.82B
Revenue 30.60B
Average Earnings Estimates
Qtr (02/16) Qtr (05/16) FY (05/16) FY (05/17)
Average Estimate $0.49 $0.53 $2.13 $2.43
Number of Analysts 15 13 18 15
High Estimate $0.54 $0.56 $2.16 $2.58
Low Estimate $0.46 $0.49 $2.10 $2.33
Prior Year $0.44 $0.49 $1.85 $2.13
Growth Rate (Year over Year) 9.44% 7.30% 15.20% 14.15%
Chart Benchmark Timeframe
Average Frequency Indicator Chart
Scale Symbol Comparison Bollinger Bands
By

Doug Kass

 | Feb 10, 2016 | 3:48 PM EST
The U.S. dollar reversed the recent trend and increased in value relative to the euro today. There were three dips today, and all of them held as the market bent a bit but didn't break. However, as of 3:15 p.m. ET, SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) was at the low of the day. The Russell's $95 support held from yesterday. Qs (Nasdaq) over Ss (S&P)and Rs (Russell) today.  Bonds didn't cooperate and moved higher in price and lower in yield. As The Lindsey Group's Peter Boockvar mentioned, the yield curve flattened. The 10- and 30-year yields dropped another two to three basis points. Municipals, however, had a bid to them and the closed-end municipal bond funds continued on their spree. High yield was flat as a pancake and so was Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB). iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) were marginally higher. Gold was down for the second day in a row, off $6.20). Boca Biff is squawking! Crude oil dropped by 30 cents, closing at $27.64, and natural gas was down a nickel. In the agricultural commodities, wheat was three pennies higher, corn and soybeans are flat. Lumber was down by $3.30. Bank stocks couldn't hold the early gains and are flat on the day as the flattening yield curve weighs on the sector. Brokerages were slight up on the day; Goldman Sachs (GS) was up $1.60). Private equity did well after a Carlyle repurchase announcement. Blackstone Group (BX) was up 2%. Alternative asset manager Oaktree Capital Group (OAK) was up by nearly $2. Energy stocks showed small losses. Retail was fractionally better after a few days of schmeissing. Old tech was mixed -- IBM (IBM) was down $3 and was a low light. Media was weighed down again by Disney (DIS) -- here is my write-up on the company -- and some old-media stocks. Twenty-First Century Fox (FOX) and CBS (CBS) shares prospered. Biotech was strong -- up 2.5%. Allergan (AGN) was the standout, up $7). My spec, Intrexon (XON), faltered after a "yuge" run.  (T)FANG was higher, led by Netflix (NFLX), but Tesla (TSLA) continues its death spiral. I remain short both. NOSH was tasty, with broad gains in Nike (NKE), O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY), Starbucks (SBUX) and Home Depot (HD). CRABBY was stronger. I bought SPY and iShares Russell 2000 (IWM) on the dips today. My "Trade of the Week" is Citigroup (C), but we need some help on the interest rate front for this to work over the near term. Stil
By

Doug Kass

 | Feb 8, 2016 | 6:17 PM EST
Again, I am endeavoring to be opportunistic (trading) in a market that is fragile,  too volatile and unpredictable to be comfortable with an abundance of many longer-term investments. At the bottom this afternoon, things looked dreadful. It was not easy to make a long trading rental and add to existing shorts. The S&P 500 ended at 1853, very close to my fair market value of 1860. The U.S. dollar weakened a bit after a five day period of consolidating against the euro. Bonds dropped by nearly 10 basis points in yield at the intermediate- and longer-term maturities. Non taxables were well-bid and closed-end municipal bond funds were slightly higher on the day. High yield was junky, reflecting systemic concerns in the European Union and China (large reserve pull down). iShares iBoxx $ High Yield  Corporate Bond Fund (HYG) was down 91 cents and SPDR Barclays High Yield Bond ETF (JNK) was down 40 cents. Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) got pulled down and traded poorly. Gold fell from its highs but still closed $32.70 to the good. Silver was up 55 cents. I had been working on a positive thesis on gold but other projects got in the way, and I blew the opportunity as the price has risen on eight out of the 10 last trading days.   In agricultural commodities, wheat got schmeissed (down eight cents) and corn was down three cents. Lumber was flat. Crude closed down 84 cents, at $30.25, but natural gas was up six cents. Energy stocks, including Exxon Mobil (XOM) and Schlumberger (SLB), prospered today, despite a depressed commodity price. It might be foreshadowing better oil prices; we will see. Banks again were weaker as European institutions took a nosedive. I added to my large position. But life insurance wasn't any better, falling from the pressure of lower yields. I covered some MetLife (MET) and Lincoln National (LNC) shorts. Brokerages got caught in the systemic rumors and concerns and were lower on the day; I added to Morgan Stanley (MS) and Goldman Sachs (GS). Oaktree Capital Group (OAK) ended the day fractionally higher. Retail that I owned wasn't half bad; Best Buy (BBY) and Bed, Bath and Beyond (BBBY) closed higher, but Macy's (M) retreated by 60 cents. That said, remodeling favs Home Depot (HD) and Lowe's (LOW) continued the thrashing that accelerated on Friday. After the close, The Gap (GPS) reported that same-store sales were down 8%. However, its guidance was better than expected and the stock is rallying a small fraction after hours. Lululemon (LULU), Coach (COH) and Under Armour (UA) were all much weaker in a poor apparel space. Autos were mixed; Ford (F) was higher and General Motors (GM) lower. I wonder, after great gains on the short side, whether I am outstaying my welcome. But, I have taken down these shorts to small. Media was awful -- even good performer Comcast (CMCSA) faltered. New lows for Disney (DIS). Old tech was weak, led by Microsoft (MSFT) and Intel (INTC), but bounced off their lows along with the rest of the market. Staples were broadly higher, led by PG, which embodies the flight to safety.  Biotech was decimated. Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) was down by another $6.50 and my spec fav Intrexon (XON) was down by a beaner. Allergan (AGN) hit a new recent low at $266. (T)FANG weakness and future were chronicled in my opening missive today. The acronym was lower, but Alphabet (GOOGL) and Netflix (NFLX) managed to rise modestly. Tesla (TSLA) got hit badly (down $14), as did Facebook (FB) and, to a lesser degree, Amazon (AMZN). NOSH was starving; Nike (NKE), O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY) and Home Depot (HD) were down bigtime. Starbucks (SBUX) rallied off the lows to end the day flat. CRABBY was mixed, led to the downside by Citigroup (C); I added it. Disease-like laggards Potash (POT) and Twitter (TWTR), which reports Wednesday, continued to lag.  iShares China Large-Cap (FXI) -- a Best Ideas List participant as a short -- doesn't have an uptick in it.  Apple's (AAPL) strength was conspicuous , up $1.20. During the day I added to many of my existing longs and added to new banks Regions Financial (RF) and BB&T (BBT); I put them on the Best Ideas List. Again, i see banks as multiyear plays and not as short-term trades. I also covered small positions in a broad list of my core shorts, including DIS, MET and LNC. As mentioned, I day traded an aggressive position in SPY for a profit. I will continue to try to accomplish that feat. I ended the day at market neutral. For the time being and assuming no change in fundamentals, I remain a SPY buyer between the capitulation low (two Wednesdays ago at $181.25 and about $183.50) and I remain a seller on strength above $185. I know that's a pretty tight range, which likely will be resolved s
By

Mark Sebastian

 | Feb 8, 2016 | 3:51 PM EST

It has a huge tailwind because of term structure, and if the VIX moves to 35, VXX will move higher.

By

Doug Kass

 | Feb 2, 2016 | 12:14 PM EST
Business TV often superficially reports on the day's hot news, but typically has no follow-through when things get bad or go rough.
By

Doug Kass

 | Feb 1, 2016 | 4:30 PM EST
I outlined my near- and intermediate-term outlook in parts one and two of this morning's opening salvo. I moved in dramatic fashion from a relatively large net long exposure taken on a week ago Wednesday and Thursday to a small net short exposure at day's end. I got more aggressive after 3 p.m. I scaled into a SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) short all day, from premarket to regular trading session (as high as $194.40) A Stanley Fischer rally? Algos sure like what he said. I view his verbiage as hedged and a non-event. The market, for the second day in a row, defied the weakness in crude oil prices, which were down $2.11 to $31.51 a barrel. Ns (Nasdaq) over Ss (S&P index) and Rs (Russell index). A strange day in light of weaker crude oil and the deteriorating price action in high yield. The U.S. dollar weakened against the euro. Gold up another $12.30 -- its sixth or seventh day in a row higher, I believe (more on gold tomorrow). Agricultural commodities saw wheat down three cents with corn and soybeans flat. Lumber was unchanged. Bonds were up by two to four basis points in yield, depending on maturities. iShares 20+ Year Treasury Bond (TLT) was down about 40 cents. Non taxables were weaker, with iShares National AMT-Free Muni Bond (MUB) down by 0.2%. But muni bond funds were higher. Strange. High yield was junky;  iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) was down 42 cents and SPDR Barclays High-Yield Bond ETF (JNK) was down 22 cents. Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) held recent gains Banks were flattish, but they had a monster run on Friday -- up 5%. They were featured on the cover of Barron's. Citigroup (C) is the strongest name. Selected financials were strong. Blackstone Group (BX), despite a Goldman Sachs downgrade, reversed bigtime. Oaktree Capital Group (OAK) was conspicuously strong. Both BX and OAK are on my Best Ideas List.  But brokerages -- such as Goldman Sachs (GS) and Morgan Stanley (MS) -- were hit with profit- taking. Life insurance, too, was death, including Lincoln National (LNC), MetLife (MET) and Hartford Financial Services Group (HIG) Retail showed large gains, led by Wal-Mart (WMT);  I eliminated a trading long rental for a large percentage gain). Macy's (M), Best Buy (BBY) and Bed, Bath and Beyond (BBBY) reversed substantially to the upside. Utilities were up and highlighted in my Diary.   Staples were mixed, despite the weakening U.S. currency. The energy sector suffered under the weight of a large decline in crude oil. Biotech recovered, led by Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX), Mallinckrodt (MNK), and my spec fav, Intrexon (XON). Autos had a dead-cat bounce. (T)FANG resumed its strength, though Amazon (AMZN) was down $12. Tesla (TSLA) and Facebook (FB), which hit a new high, were features. NOSH was tasty, fueled by Nike (NKE) and O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY). CRABBY was up small. Last program standing defines the close. Alphabet (GOOGL) tonite -- Boca Biff is short Alphabet, but he is not that good of a speller! I reinitiated a SPY short (
By

Doug Kass

 | Feb 1, 2016 | 1:32 PM EST
Taking a Closer Look at the Domestic Parks. We have been bullish on the domestic parks segment since spring 2013, given our belief that the margin-expansion story would accelerate faster than expected, driven by moderating expenses and stronger revenue growth. We now think the bulk of the domestic-margin expansion has played out, with occupancy approaching peak levels and ticket-price increases likely moderating. Occupancy Approaching Peak Levels. With domestic-occupancy levels increasing from 82% in fiscal 2011 to 88% in fiscal 2016E, we think the majority of future revenue growth from the hotels will have to come from price going forward. We note the increase in occupancy (even with the addition of "Art of Animation") translated to an estimated incremental 1.37 million occupied rooms in fiscal 2016E compared to fiscal 2011, at an average room rate (over the five-year period) of $282 a night. Hotel Promotions Moderating. Given the increased occupancy levels, we expect DIS to be less promotional at Walt Disney World and Disneyland. We have already seen promotions at WDW for this spring come in 5% below a year ago. Increased Occupancy Drives Ticket, Food, Beverage and Merchandise Sales. Assuming the increase in occupancy helped drive attendance and spend at the parks, we estimate this accounted for incremental revenue and EBIT of $858 million and $476 million, respectively, over the past five years, representing 50%+ of EBIT growth at the domestic parks. Margins & Estimates. We assume domestic-park margins have increased from 12.8% in fiscal 2011 to an expected 21.1% in fiscal 2016. Going forward, we assume annual margin expansion of about 60 basis points a year in fiscal 2016-2020, translating to a slowing of EBIT growth to 9% over the same period. We are tweaking our fiscal 2017 and 2018 earnings per share to $6 and $6.63, respectively, vs. the prior estimate of $6.01 and $6.65 and the consensus of $6.22 and $6.81. Our fiscal 2016 EPS is unchanged at $5.57."
By

Doug Kass

 | Jan 28, 2016 | 6:01 PM EST
My opener captured my near-term market view and levels of support and resistance.  The market is in the hands of machines and algos -- they are ruining sentiment and our business.  Dow Intradaze!  Words can't describe today's (T)FANG Insanity, which was demonstrated in trading in Amazon (AMZN) both during the trading day (up $52) and after hours (down $80!). Thanks to my pal David Rocker (Rocker Partners legend) for getting me to write about the insanity. My exchanges with Rev Shark in Columnist Conversations are an example of the uniqueness of our site and the value of respected debate.  Auto stocks, despite a good Ford (F) beat, were lower on the day. I wrote again about "Peak Autos."     I covered my small Amazon short in after hours at $549. I plan to re-short on strength.  Here is my short rationale.  Ss (S &P) and Qs (Nasdaq) over Rs (Russell). The U.S. dollar was weaker. Crude oil closed up $1.46 to $33.76. Natural gas was six cents higher. Gold was down $2. I remain uninvolved and I plan to stay uninvolved. Agricultural commodities: wheat and corn were both four cents lower; soybeans got crushed, down fifteen cents. OJ prices ripped higher, up 8%. Bonds got hit a bit and interest rates rose modestly, by one to two basis points in yield. Municipals were flat but closed-end municipal bond funds rose smartly, with some gaining close to 1% --BlackRock Municipal Income Trust II (BLE), BlackRock Municipal Target Term Trust (BTT) and Eaton Vance Municipal Income 2028 Term Trust (ETX) High-yield bonds were well-bid -- iShares iBoxx $ High Yield Corporate Bond ETF (HYG) was up 40 cents and SPDR Barclays High-Yield Bond ETF (JNK) was up 15 cents. Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) had an outsize gain of 35 cents, the largest daily move I can remember, and traded over $13 briefly. I have remarked in each of my last three Takeaways that the price action was improving. Phew! Financials had a good day, with regional banks beating out their money center brethren. I added to Citigroup (C), Bank of America (BAC), Wells Fargo (WFC), Comerica (CMA) and Fifth Third Bancorp (FITB) in the last two days. WFC is my long "Trade of the Week." Life insurance stocks were modestly higher. I am long Hartford Financial Services Group (HIG) and short MetLife (MET) and Lincoln National (LNC). Energy stocks responded brilliantly to the crude price rise. Last week I opportunistically covered Schlumberger (SLB) and Exxon Mobil (XOM) at really good prices. Today, SLB was up $4 and XOM rose $1.70! Retail stocks were weaker, but only modestly so. I suspect the proximate cause was higher energy prices.. Old tech was stronger and Microsoft (MSFT) results were an after-hours highlight, with shares up 2%-plus after the close.  Media still is weak, led by my Best Ideas List short, Disney (DIS).  (T)FANG was insane and broadly higher, but obviously got hit after the close, reflecting Amazon's miss. Facebook (FB) was the world's fair, but Netflix (NFLX) was conspicuous in its continued underperformance. I covered FB short last week at $91.30. Tesla (TSLA), my short "Trade of the Week," was flat, including after hours. Here is my NFLX short write-up. The shares are about $20 lower than its price when I put it on my Best Ideas List as a short a bit more than three months ago. So far, so good. NOSH was strong, with Nike (NKE) and O'Reilly Automotive (ORLY) doing well. Starbucks (SBUX) was also higher, a short. CRABBY was higher, thanks to BAC and BGB. Two new Best Ideas flourished -- Goldman Sachs (GS) and Procter & Gamble (PG). GS was up $3.40 and is now $6 above my Best Ideas price entrance. Du Pont (DD) hasn't done as well but was higher today and I am accumulating. More on all three by next week. Weight Watchers (WTW) down by more than a beaner, as Oprah gained four pounds this week from too much bread! Alibaba's (BABA) price reversal was vicious, closing down $3 after being up a like amount. The headline numbers were good, but there was less than meets the eye regarding their quality. I would stay clear of Yahoo! (YHOO) despite a lot of interest that I received from subs. Potash (POT) traded better after the dividend cut. I will update my thoughts on the conference report and results. My other loser, Radian Group (RDN), even rallied. More on this one soon -- still trying to come to grips with the reason for the sharp price drop. Glib, your name is Laszlo Birinyi. I am sorry to write so bluntly, but it's true as I vividly recall his self-confidence on "Fast Money." Self-confidence is the worst trait in a business with so much uncertainty. Remember this message when you get the "hard sells" in the business media. 
By

Brian Sozzi

 | Jan 28, 2016 | 10:00 AM EST

Just look at the depressing earnings season.

By

Doug Kass

 | Jan 27, 2016 | 6:05 PM EST
A day full of sound and fury but perhaps signifying nothing. As I expected, the Fed acknowledged tightening financial conditions in the credit markets. Spreads have widened and the cost of debt and capital has risen. Here's my Fed analysis  and my strategy.  I viewed the strength in oil, in bank stocks and in credit (high yield) as providing hope and encouragement to me. I remain upbeat. I view the selloff today as an opportunity; I added to Hartford Financial Services Group (HIG), Comerica (CMA), Citigroup (C), Bank of America (BAC) and others. I had a damn love fest with RevShark today! Not surprisingly, stocks sold off and RevShark's correction prediction came to be. Here is what I wrote to Rev in Columnist Conversation: "I believe the obvious and consensus trade is to sell as the markets have ripped from Wednesday's lows -- of course there is a lot of space between then and now. But I am making what I believe to be the less obvious and contrary trade -- and I am buying. I believe markets will be relieved and that many are "offsides" for a further market advance. The beauty here is that you and I employ a level of transparently in our real-time trades, exercising our beliefs and show our analysis that yields our conclusions. Either outcome, I like -- and I hope is helpful to our subs." Where was the Divine Ms. M today when I needed her? On the other hand, I don't even know how to respond to Roger Arnold's over-the-top column on a "failing" Bank of America!!!!?!?!?!   But I shall remain respectful. From Columnist Conversations: "I intended to respond to your BAC column but it's been a hectic day and I didn't get the chance. I am diametrically opposed to your view, conclusion and analysis. The only way to deal with your speculative claims is to respond with facts. In the fullness of time I will show you my spreadsheets, which show that the bank's balance sheet is significantly improved and that it is growing its loan portfolio. The key to a bank's future growth is its capital and deposits, and Bank of America has plenty of both." Futures are up after the close. Up five handles -- Facebook (FB) effect? Futures recovered nearly half of the 30-point drop as of 4:40 p.m. ET. They bent but didn't break. SPDR S&P 500 ETF (SPY) closed down $2.07 -- it was down $3.10 at the worse level of the day. Technically, it looks like we had the third repudiation of SPY $191 and we have the support at the Wednesday gap at $185. But, so obvious! The U.S. dollar weakened. Gold was up another $4.40, continuing its multiday skein higher. Crude oil rose by 60 cents. The correlation between stocks and energy prices was abandoned today. In agricultural commodities, wheat was schmeissed (down eight cents) and corn was flat. Lumber was strong. Bonds reversed slightly to the upside after early morning weakness. Yields were flat to down two basis points across the maturities range. Municipals were well-bid and high yield was slightly lower in price and higher in yield. I am all in Blackstone/GSO Strategic Credit Fund (BGB) and the three-day winning streak stayed intact. I finally like the developing price action. Apple (AAPL) was a feature and I contributed my two bits!  Banks, though well off their highs, were up on the day in a broadly lower tape. Life insurance stocks continued their steady descent; we have nearly 25% gains on MetLife (MET) and Lincoln National (LNC) shorts now. Staples were strong, absolutely and relatively, with gains in Procter & Gamble (PG), 3M (MMM) and Kimberly-Clark (KMB). Oils were mixed despite stronger crude prices. Media continued to get crushed; my gains are building up in my short book in this sector, where I'm short Comcast (CMCSA) and Disney (DIS). Old tech was crippled today, led by Microsoft (MSFT) and Buffett fav IBM (IBM). Another new low for iShares China Large-Cap (FXI). A short and on the Best Ideas List.  Autos were stable. Ford (F) was down and General Motors (GM) was up.  I am sticking to these shorts, but trimmed considerably last week. (T)FANG was broadly lower, ex Facebook (see below). I have been warning about this acronym for two months and its underperformance is conspicuous."The Day of Reckoning Near for the (T)FANGs?" from two weeks ago. Amazon (AMZN) was down $18 ("A Long List of Reasons to Short Amazon") and Netflix (NFLX) is really breaking down. I recently wrote up both and shorted -- NFLX is on my Best Ideas List (10/12/2015 at $113).  NOSH was not tasty, with Nike (NKE) and Starbucks (SBUX) weighing it down. CRABBY was not so; it was up across the board, though timidly so. Miracle of miracles!  Potash (POT), Radian Group (RDN) and Twitter (TWTR) showed some life after death today. All higher, but modestly so. eBay (EBAY) missed and guided lower after the close. Shares down by 11%. Mo mo oh no! Biotech was a wreck, with broad losses in the primary and secondary names. iShares Nasdaq Biotechnology (IBB) was down by almost 4%, led by rollup Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX) going down and by Mallinckrodt (MNK). The same sellers in IBB are likely selling (T)FANG. Facebook's results were the "world's fair." Nothing NOT to dislike!
By

Jim Cramer

 | Jan 26, 2016 | 12:04 PM EST

TheStreet's Jim Cramer said remember his mantra on Apple ahead of its earnings report, 'own the stock, don't trade it.'

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