Doug Kass

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Doug Kass is the president of Seabreeze Partners Management Inc.Expand

Until 1996, he was senior portfolio manager at Omega Advisors, a $6 billion investment partnership. Before that he was executive senior vice president and director of institutional equities of First Albany Corporation and JW Charles/CSG. He also was a General Partner of Glickenhaus & Co., and held various positions with Putnam Management and Kidder, Peabody. Kass received his bachelor's from Alfred University, and received a master's of business administration in finance from the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School in 1972. He co-authored "Citibank: The Ralph Nader Report" with Nader and the Center for the Study of Responsive Law and currently serves as a guest host on CNBC's "Squawk Box."Collapse

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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 12:38 PM EDT
Jim "El Capitan" Cramer argues
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 10:45 AM EDT
From Minneapolis Federal Reserve President Neel Kashkari's Twitter account: Reaching for yield
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 10:34 AM EDT
The Commerce Department reported today that first-quarter U.S. real gross domestic product only grew by 0.5%. And that was against an easy comparison from a year earlier, when we had bad weather and the Federal Reserve's Zero Interest Rate Policy at home, plus negative rates in Europe. For the fourth-consecutive year, consensus expectations for S&P 500 earnings have been too optimistic. We are in an earnings recession. The Fed's monetary largesse has pulled business activity, corporate sales and profits forward. But that spigot has lost effectiveness, and U.S. economic "escape velocity" appears to be an illusion (just reread my
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 10:18 AM EDT
Doubled the size of my short, just now.
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 10:01 AM EDT
Peter Boockvar parses today's U.S. economic data: "The Commerce Department says the U.S. economy grew by just 0.5% q/o/q annualized during the first…
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 9:23 AM EDT
Like many market watchers, Peter Boockvar is confused this morning: "So let me get this straight: The Bank of Japan surprised markets on Jan. 29 by…
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 8:37 AM EDT
Kept Japan's benchmark rate unchanged at -0.1%. Retained its current monetary base target, maintaining the same pace of asset purchases. Delayed the timing to reach the bank's 2% inflation target. Most economists had expected little policy change from the Japanese central bank. But markets had been pricing in all sorts of "monetary goodies," from accelerated equity ETF purchases to a doubling of government-bond purchases to LTRO-style lending to banks. In the absence of such moves, the Japanese yen rallied by the largest amount in five years against the euro and the biggest gains seen in roughly a year against the U.S. dollar. The Bottom Line "Guessing what governments do next at this moment in time is not a good way to play these markets. Hoping that there will be more stimulus will lead to disappointment, because hope isn't a very good strategy." -- Andrew Clarke of Mirabaud Asia Ltd., talking to Bloomberg about the BOJ decision to stand pat (April 28, 2016) The trend has long been your friend in this market, but you should stay alert for any inflection point and change of direction. Make no mistake about it, extreme monetary policy has inflated global equity prices; just look at how the Nikkei, Europe and the S&P 500 futures all fell after the BOJ disappointed markets. If central banks ever normalize monetary policy and/or the currency train derails, expect all asset prices to lose their current moorings and retreat -- something that looks inevitable from my perch. To think that the powers that be can orchestrate tranquility when debt levels are where they are and economic growth isn't self-sustaining seems imprudent to me. That's why it remains my view that May 2015 marked the start of a broad, important market-topping process -- and nothing that I've seen so far this year has altered that outlook. So, I remain very committed to the short side.
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 8:04 AM EDT
PCLN ceo resigning due to personal conduct issues
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Doug Kass

 | Apr 28, 2016 | 8:00 AM EDT
http://finance.yahoo.com/news/inplay-briefing-com-055139997.html#pot I would not bottom fish in these shares - as discussed in CC yesterday afternoon.

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